Funding your studies in Germany

German Language Coach; fund your studies in GermanyLast week we looked at some of the benefits and practicalities of studying in Germany, however one of the most important considerations for many people is how they will support themselves financially whilst they continue their education. Though most German universities do not charge tuition fees, there are still living costs to be planned for, with statistics suggesting that students require an average of 800 euros per month to cover these.
One option is to investigate the possibility of a scholarship. Many educational institutions provide these for students who meet specific criteria, and for foreign students, particularly post-graduates and doctoral candidates, there may be a possibility of funding from a private institution. The German Academic Exchange Service (Deutscher Akademischer Austausch Dienst) has details of scholarships currently available which vary according to country of origin and field of study.
An internship is an excellent route into the German job market for foreign students; indeed these are a compulsory part of many study programmes. As some internships are paid, this can considerably ease the financial burden. Finding the right internship will require some research, and once again there is useful information on the DAAD website to help you understand your options.
Many students also work during their spare time. Students are allowed to work up to 20 hours per week during term time and unlimited hours during the holidays, and this can be particularly useful for foreign students as it will not only bring some money in, but it will also give you an added opportunity to improve your social skills and make new friends.
Our German tutors in London are on hand to help you acquire the language skills you will need should you decide that studying in Germany is the right move for you.
in Germany
Last week we looked at some of the benefits and practicalities of studying in Germany, however one of the most important considerations for many people is how they will support themselves financially whilst they continue their education. Though most German universities do not charge tuition fees, there are still living costs to be planned for, with statistics suggesting that students require an average of 800 euros per month to cover these.
One option is to investigate the possibility of a scholarship. Many educational institutions provide these for students who meet specific criteria, and for foreign students, particularly post-graduates and doctoral candidates, there may be a possibility of funding from a private institution. The German Academic Exchange Service (Deutscher Akademischer Austausch Dienst) has details of scholarships currently available which vary according to country of origin and field of study.
An internship is an excellent route into the German job market for foreign students; indeed these are a compulsory part of many study programmes. As some internships are paid, this can considerably ease the financial burden. Finding the right internship will require some research, and once again there is useful information on the DAAD website to help you understand your options.
Many students also work during their spare time. Students are allowed to work up to 20 hours per week during term time and unlimited hours during the holidays, and this can be particularly useful for foreign students as it will not only bring some money in, but it will also give you an added opportunity to improve your social skills and make new friends.
Our German tutors in London are on hand to help you acquire the language skills you will need should you decide that studying in Germany is the right move for you.

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